How to Make Jammy Eggs

Share the love!

Aren’t boiled eggs just the best? Hard boiled eggs are perfect for egg salad or potato salad, soft boiled eggs are wonderful for dipping. By far the most popular eggs at my house are Jammy Eggs. This is where the whites are cooked all the way through, and the yolk is still super soft, glossy, and luxurious, but not drippy.

Perfectly cooked jammy eggs on a plate.

Jammy Eggs are my go-to when I’m having them on their own (with a pinch of crunchy salt), or in a bowl of soup. The jammy consistency makes it so the yolk stays put instead of pouring out into the bowl.

Why steamed eggs are better than boiled eggs

I prefer steaming my eggs in a small amount of water, rather than fully submerging them in water. There are a few reasons for this:

  1. A small amount of water (1/2 inch or so) comes to a boil much faster than a large amount, making this a super convenient cooking method for busy mornings when I don’t have time to wait for a huge pot of water to boil.
  2. Because the water boils quickly, it also comes back up to temperature quickly after you’ve lowered in your cold eggs. This helps keep the cooking time consistent, regardless of how many eggs you’re cooking at once.
  3. It’s much easier to lower eggs into a small amount of water. You can just put them in without burning your fingers, and they are less likely to crack!

*Note: Don’t forget about your eggs! The water will evaporate much faster than with boiled eggs, and you don’t want to end up with a dry pot. In my experience, 1/2 inch of water allows plenty of time to cook the eggs.

3 eggs in a pot, cooking in a small amount of boiling water.

How to make perfect Jammy Eggs

  1. Add 1/2 inch of water to a small pot or a skillet, cover with a lid, and bring the water to a boil over high heat.
  2. Gently lower in as many large, cold eggs as you desire into the boiling water. They should all fit into the pot in a single layer.
  3. Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to medium, and set a timer for 7 minutes. The water should be at a rolling boil, not a raging boil.
  4. While the eggs cook, prepare an ice bath by filling a bowl with ice and water. *Lazy version: If I’m only cooking 2 eggs, I’ll often cool them down by simply running them under some cold tap water.
  5. After 7 minutes, lift the eggs out of the water with a slotted spoon, and plunge them into the ice water bath. Allow them to chill for at least 30 seconds if you want to eat them while they are still slightly warm, or for up to 5 minutes to cool them completely.
  6. Enjoy your Jammy Eggs right away, or store them unpeeled in the fridge for up to 3 days. You can also turn them into marinated eggs by peeling them and storing them in a marinade. Delicious.

*Note: Marinated eggs tend to set slightly more in the fridge, so you may find the yolks to be even jammier and thicker than an unmarinated egg. They should still be deliciously glossy and luxurious.

A covered pot with 3 eggs steaming inside.
Steaming the eggs in a small pot or pan with a tight fitting lid.
3 steamed eggs in the shell, cooling in an ice water bath.
Chilling the eggs in an ice water bath after steaming.

Egg boiling variables

Making perfectly Jammy Eggs comes down to timing. But timing can be affected by many variables, which is why it can be tricky to get right.

  • Egg size: The larger the egg, the longer it will take to cook. If your egg is smaller than average, knock 30-45 seconds off the cooking time. I find 7 minutes to be perfect for large eggs.
  • Egg temperature: If you’re based in Europe or the UK, or if you have your own chickens, you might store your eggs at room temperature. Room temp eggs will cook faster than eggs that are cold from the fridge.
  • Carry over cooking: The eggs will continue to cook after you remove them from the hot water, unless you plunge them immediately into cold, preferably icy water. Be snappy!
  • Water temperature: The water temperature drops when you put cold eggs in it, and the more eggs you add, the colder the water will get, hence, the longer it’ll take to come back up to a boil. This is one of the reasons I prefer to steam eggs in a small amount of water. It takes less time to heat back up after adding the eggs, helping to make the cooking time more consistent.

These variables can have a big impact, since the difference between soft runny yolks and jammy yolks can be as minor as 30 seconds of cooking time. At the end of the day, I think it’s important to go easy on yourself and know that some perfectly Jammy Eggs will just be more perfect than others. They will all be delicious nonetheless!

Cooking time is key!

Here we have 3 boiled/steamed eggs, removed from the boiling water and plunged into ice water after 6, 7, and 8 minutes. A little bit of time goes a long way!

How to serve Jammy Eggs

Is there anything that wouldn’t be made better with the addition of a Jammy Egg?

I’m a big fan of eating Jammy Eggs for breakfast, with a pinch of crunchy salt and a few cracks of black pepper. They are also fantastic when smushed onto toast.

Jammy eggs on avocado toast with cherry tomatoes.
Avocado tomato egg toast. I cannot think of a better breakfast.

A Jammy Egg is also a welcome addition to a bowl of noodle soup like ramen, or a dumpling soup (or really any soup).

3 bowls of noodle soup with a jammy egg on top of each bowl.
An egg on a bowl of noodle soup is just the best.

Jammy Eggs are superb on salads too, and they’re a great source of fat and protein, making any salad a whole lot more satisfying.

A bowl of green salad with a jammy egg on top.
Silky yolks make salads much more luxurious.

Jammy Egg troubleshooting

The shell is hard to peel

The most common reason for eggs not peeling easily is if the eggs are extremely fresh. The fresher the egg, the stronger the bond between the egg white and the shell. The only real solution is to let the eggs age for a few days before using them for boiled eggs. Generally speaking, the following tips can be super helpful for peeling eggs:

  • Shock the eggs in cold water right after cooking, and let them cool for at least 30 seconds.
  • Use a teaspoon to help remove the shell.
  • Some say that steamed eggs may be easier to peel than boiled eggs. Since that’s the method we’re using, we’re golden!

The yolks are overcooked

Your eggs might be on the small side, and will take less time to cook. Try cooking them for 6 minutes instead of 7.

The yolks are undercooked

Your eggs may be on the large side, or your fridge might be extra cold. Both factors will add to the cooking time. Try cooking them for 8 minutes instead of 7.

A plate of boiled eggs cooked for 6 minutes, 7 minutes, and 8 minutes.

Frequently asked questions

How do I prevent eggs from cracking while boiling?

Some say that adding a bit of salt or vinegar to the water can help prevent cracking. However since I started using this steamed egg method, I have never had a single egg crack. (Knock on wood).

Why do boiled eggs sometimes have a greenish-gray ring around the yolk?

This is caused by overcooking, which leads to a reaction between the sulfur in the egg whites and the iron in the yolks. Nothing we have to worry about with 7 minute eggs!

Can I reheat Jammy Eggs?

I wouldn’t recommend it! They may become rubbery and lose some of their texture. It’s generally best to eat them cold if you’re not eating them immediately after cooking.

I hope this helps! Let me know how your eggs turn out 🙂

Perfectly cooked jammy eggs on a plate.

Jammy Eggs

Jammy Eggs are my go-to when I’m having them on their own (with a pinch of crunchy salt), or in a bowl of soup.
5 from 2 votes
Course Breakfast & Brunch, Dinner
Cuisine American, brunch, european
Calories 63 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 small pot with a fitted lid

Ingredients
  

  • eggs
  • 1/2 inch water

Instructions
 

  • Add 1/2 inch of water to a small pot or a skillet, cover with a lid, and bring the water to a boil over high heat.
  • Gently lower in as many large, cold eggs as you desire into the boiling water. They should all fit into the pot in a single layer. (No stacking).
  • Cover with a lid, reduce the heat to medium, and set your timer for 7 minutes. The water should be at a rolling boil, not a raging boil.
  • While the eggs cook, prepare an ice bath by filling a bowl with ice and water.
  • After 7 minutes, lift the eggs out of the water with a slotted spoon, and plunge them into the ice water bath.
  • Allow them to chill for at least 30 seconds if you want to eat them while they are still slightly warm, or for up to 5 minutes to cool them completely.
  • Enjoy your jammy eggs right away, or store them unpeeled in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Video

Nutrition

Serving: 1eggCalories: 63kcalCarbohydrates: 0.3gProtein: 6gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 2gTrans Fat: 0.02gCholesterol: 164mgSodium: 63mgPotassium: 61mgSugar: 0.2gVitamin A: 238IUCalcium: 25mgIron: 1mg
Keyword eggs
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.