Mason Jar Mayonnaise (With Vegan Option!)

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Since learning this quick and easy method of making easy homemade Mason Jar Mayonnaise, I have never bought another jar from the grocery store. With this simple method, you dump all the ingredients to a mason jar (including the oil) and use a stick blender to emulsify the mayo to perfection. Once you’ve got this one minute mayo technique dialled in, you will likely be making your own mayonnaise from scratch a lot more often!

An immersion blender after blending mayonnaise.
Thick and creamy mayonnaise! I used the aquafaba method for these photos. The egg version is even thicker!

What even is mayonnaise?

If you’ve never made homemade mayonnaise or never seen anyone else make it, you might be under the impression that mayonnaise is a dairy-based condiment. It looks like it should be! It’s rich and creamy and… kinda dairy-like! But mayo is mostly oil, plus egg, acid, salt, and mustard, made creamy and white through the process of emulsification.

Why bother making homemade mayo?

I have no beef against store bought mayo (I’m on team Hellmann’s personally), but there is something really satisfying about making it yourself. It’s a bit cheaper, you can choose your preferred oil, and it’s so quick! The main benefit of store bought is that it seems to last forever, which is handy if you don’t go through very much mayo, but I always manage to use up my homemade mayo fairly quickly.

Note: I have heard that if you add a splash of sauerkraut juice to your homemade mayo it lasts much longer. I have yet to test it, but if anyone here has, please let us know how it went!

A spoonful of mayonnaise with the jar of mayo in the background.
Making mayonnaise using this easy method almost feels like magic.

The old way vs. the new way

When I first learned to make mayo (Food Network university, then later in cooking school) I was taught to wrap a damp cloth around the base of a mixing bowl to keep it stable, then ever so slowly drizzle oil into the egg yolks and other ingredients while whisking vigorously. it took awhile, and it was an ordeal! We later learned that you could use a blender, but you still needed to slowly drizzle in the oil.

I think it was Kenji who first showed me the light, explaining that when using a mason jar and an immersion blender (stick blender) to make mayo, the oil naturally floats to the top, allowing you to add everything to the jar at once and let the oil incorporate itself gradually, with gravity.

And let me tell you, this method is kinda life changing.

Vegan mayonnaise on sourdough bread with tomatoes and basil.
Sourdough toast with vegan mayo, sliced tomatoes, and fresh basil.

Using a whole egg vs just the yolk

I have historically only ever used the yolk to make mayo, but with this method I always use the whole egg. It means I don’t have a random egg white lying around my fridge, and I think it lightens up the mayo a bit. Plus: Extra protein!

A note on egg safety

Whether or not eggs are safe to eat raw seems to depend on where in the world you are eating them (and which governing body is making the rules). Where I live, in Canada, eggs undergo an inspection process before they enter grocery stores making the risk of salmonella poisoning extremely low. In the US, the USDA recommends using egg substitutes instead of raw egg in uncooked applications. If you’re unsure about the safety of raw eggs, there is good news! Aquafaba mayo is just as good! Better go with that version.

Equipment and Ingredients

Alrighty. Here’s what you’ll need to make the easiest mayo of your life.

Ingredients and equipment needed to make vegan or regular mayo in a mason jar.
Everything you need to make mayo in under a minute.

Equipment:

  • A powerful immersion blender
  • A jar (mason jar or jam jar, something that just fits the head of the blender).

Ingredients:

  • Egg or aquafaba
  • Neutral-flavored oil, like avocado or sunflower
  • Cider vinegar or lemon juice
  • Dijon mustard
  • Salt

How to make homemade mayo

  • Dump all the ingredients into the jar (including the oil)
  • Wait a sec to allow the oil to float to the topVegan mayonnaise ingredients in a jar, ready to blend.
  • Put the immersion blender in the jar, making sure the head of the blender is flush against the bottom of the jar, with the yolk (if using) underneath the head of the blender.
  • While holding the blender on the bottom of the jar, turn it on full-speed. After a few seconds, slowly begin incorporating more of the oil by slightly lifting the blender from the bottom of the jar.Immersion blender in a mason jar with mayo ingredients.
  • Once you can see that it is emulsifying, continue to blend until the entire mixture is well-emulsified.
  • That’s it!
An immersion blender after blending mayonnaise.

Homemade mayo variations

Flavored mayos and aiolis

Did you know that aioli literally translates to “garlic oil”? So by definition, aioli contains garlic. Think about that the next time you see “garlic aioli” on a menu. (Or chipotle aioli, which almost never contains garlic. It’s a lie!) I wish people would just stop trying to be so fancy and call it what it is. It’s chipotle mayo!

And yes, you can totally add canned chipotle to this mayo, or fresh herbs, or lemon zest, or chili and lime… the flavored mayo options are endless!

A bowl of mayonnaise with smoked paprika.
Adding smoked paprika to homemade mayo.

When adding extras to your mayo, be sure to add them after blending the initial mayo to make sure you get a good emulsion. In other words, make the mayo, then add the extra stuff. Remember that adding any liquids will thin out the mayonnaise.

Japanese (Kewpie) style mayo

I loooove the slightly sweet richness of Kewpie mayo. To recreate a similar flavor, add 1-2 teaspoons of sugar and a couple of pinches of dashi powder to your finished mayo. Delicious!

How to make mayonnaise without egg

The best way to make egg-free mayonnaise is by using aquafaba: AKA the starchy liquid at the bottom of the can of beans or chickpeas. This stuff has so many fun purposes, it’s hard to believe that we’ve been throwing it down the drain for years! Aquafaba is a great substitute for egg in mayonnaise because it acts as an emulsifier. You can also use it in place of egg as a binding agent in meatballs and burgers (like my Mushroom Walnut Burgers) and you can even use it to make vegan meringue!

When making mayo with aquafaba, I find that 60 ml (1/4 cup) is the right amount to replace one egg.

*Tip: To give vegan mayo an “eggy” flavor and color, use black salt instead of regular salt, and add a pinch of turmeric to give it a slight yellowish tinge.

A woman holding a bag of black salt with a jar of turmeric in the background.
Make vegan mayo look and taste “eggy” with black salt and turmeric.

Homemade Mayonnaise Troubleshooting

  1. Make sure your jar is only wide enough to fit your blender. If the jar is a lot wider than the head of the blender, the mayo won’t emulsify.
  2. Make sure your stick blender is pretty powerful. If it’s an old one with a crappy old motor, it won’t work.
  3. Start blending on full blast right away. If you start it on low speed, it won’t emulsify. Really put your foot on the gas!
  4. For the first few seconds of blending, do not lift the blender from the bottom of the jar. Once you can feel that it has thickened, you can start lifting it slightly to incorporate more of the oil.
  5. I have only ever done this with aquafaba from canned chickpeas or black beans. Use any other aquafaba at your own risk.
  6. If it doesn’t work out, you can try again! Just pour more aquafaba and mustard into the bottom of a jar, and pour your broken mayo on top as if it is new oil.
Vegan mayo on sourdough bread with tomatoes and basil.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I use any type of oil to make mayonnaise?

Yes, you can use any type of oil to make mayonnaise, but the type of oil you use will affect the taste. Neutral oils like avocado or sunflower oil are often used because they don’t overpower the taste. I don’t advise using extra virgin olive oil because the flavor is a bit strong for this.

How long does homemade mayonnaise last?

Homemade mayonnaise can last for up to one week in the refrigerator. Always make sure to store it in a covered container. I have heard that you can make it last longer by adding some sauerkraut juice to the mayo, but I’ve never tried it, so I can’t vouch for it. I will test it out and report back!

What can I do with the leftover aquafaba?

Leftover aquafaba can be used in a variety of ways. It can be used as an egg substitute in many recipes, even whipped into meringue! I don’t feel bad about throwing my leftovers down the drain though. There’s only so much bean juice you can use!

Can I use a food processor or regular blender to make mayo?

Yes you can! But you’d have to slowly drizzle the oil into the rest of the ingredients while blending on full-speed. (This quick method will not work).

Can this recipe be made low-fat?

Not really. My advice for lightening up mayo-based recipes is to use 50% mayo and 50% Greek yogurt. This works great in things like creamy egg, tuna, or pasta salads.

Great! Now that I have mayo, what recipes can I use it in?

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

I hope you give this mayo method a try, and that you even swap out the store bought stuff for homemade once in awhile!

An immersion blender after blending mayonnaise.

Mason Jar Mayonnaise (With Vegan Option!)

Once you learn this easy method for making homemade mayonnaise, you will likely buy the store bought stuff a lot less often!
5 from 3 votes
Prep Time 1 minute
Cook Time 0 minutes
Total Time 1 minute
Course Sauces & Condiments
Cuisine european
Servings 20 Tablespoons
Calories 129 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 Immersion blender high-powered
  • 1 jar like a mason jar or jam jar

Ingredients
 
 

  • 250 ml oil avocado, sunflower, or other neutral oil
  • 1 egg or 1/4c aquafaba. See recipe notes
  • 1 tsp vinegar apple cider (lemon juice works too)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp dijon mustard

Instructions
 

  • Dump all the ingredients into the jar (including the oil).
  • Wait a sec to allow the oil to float to the top.
  • Put the immersion blender in the jar, making sure the head of the blender is flush against the bottom of the jar, with the yolk (if using) underneath the head of the blender.
  • While holding the blender on the bottom of the jar, turn it on full-speed. After a few seconds, slowly begin incorporating more of the oil by slightly lifting the blender from the bottom of the jar.
  • Once you can see that it is emulsifying, continue to blend until the entire mixture is well-emulsified.
  • Store the mayo in the jar you blended it in until you are ready to enjoy!

Video

Notes

  • To make vegan mayo with aquafaba, replace the egg with or 60ml (1/4 cup) aquafaba and follow the same process.

 

Egg safety note:

Whether or not eggs are safe to eat raw seems to depend on where in the world you are eating them (and which governing body is making the rules). Where I live, in Canada, eggs undergo an inspection process before they enter grocery stores making the risk of salmonella poisoning extremely low. In the US, the USDA recommends using egg substitutes instead of raw egg in uncooked applications. If you’re unsure about the safety of raw eggs, there is good news! Aquafaba is a fantastic egg substitute for your mayo!

Nutrition

Serving: 1TbspCalories: 129kcalCarbohydrates: 0.04gProtein: 0.3gFat: 14gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 4gMonounsaturated Fat: 9gTrans Fat: 0.1gCholesterol: 8mgSodium: 66mgPotassium: 4mgFiber: 0.02gSugar: 0.01gVitamin A: 12IUVitamin C: 0.002mgCalcium: 2mgIron: 0.04mg
Keyword mayonnaise
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

4 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Amazing! This recipe is so easy and so quick and SO DELISH. I can say I will never be buying store bought again. This is perfection. Thank you!

  2. 5 stars
    Wonderful aquafaba recipe! Thank you so much.

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