Potato Scones (AKA Tattie Scones)

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If you often find yourself with leftover mashed potatoes to use up, Potato Scones are one of the best ways to do it! They are easy, quick, and super delicious.

A stack of potato scones on a cooling rack.

Potato Scones are a perfect accompaniment to eggs in the morning, or on a fluffy roll with bacon, black pudding, or even haggis! (Or vegetarian haggis!)

What are Potato Scones?

Not to be confused with regular scones, Potato Scones, (AKA tattie scones), are a traditional Scottish dish and are commonly served as part of a full Scottish breakfast. Potato Scones are made with a mixture of flour and mashed potato that gets shaped into patties and pan fried until golden brown. Potato Scones have a soft and fluffy texture and a savory flavor, making them a lovely accompaniment to a variety of foods. I particularly love them with breakfast!

Those of you who know me, know that I spent a couple of my formative food years working in an incredible farm shop in Scotland. It was there that I fell in love with Potato Scones, haggis, and whisky 🙂

Potato scones on a cooling rack.

What you’ll need to make this recipe

Equipment

To make these Potato Scones, you’ll need a bowl to mix the dough, a flipper to flip them, and a nonstick griddle or pan to fry them. I like using a cast iron pan, or even better, a large, electric griddle so I can fry all the Potato Scones in one batch.

Ingredients

The only ingredients you need for Potato Scones are mashed potato, flour, salt, pepper, and a bit of oil for frying.

Mashed potatoes in a dish, ready to be turned into potato scones.

How to make Potato Scones

Making the dough

  • Add the cooled mashed potatoes, plus the flour, salt, and pepper to a bowl or a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, and mix until just combined. The dough should not stick to your hands, and it should be firm enough to roll with a rolling pin.
Potato scone dough ready to be shaped.

Shaping the Potato Scones

There are lots of ways to shape these Scones. Traditionally, they are pressed into large, flat rounds, and marked with a criss-cross indentation that makes it easy to divide the round into quarters. I prefer shaping them into unified, bun-sized rounds. Here’s how I do it:

  • Transfer the Potato Scone dough onto a well-floured work surface, and use a floured rolling pin to roll the dough to 1/4-1/3 inch thick.
  • Use a large, round cookie cutter to cut out the Scones. Continue shaping and re-rolling the dough until you have used it all up. (You can cut them into whatever shape you want, but using a 4-inch cookie cutter will give you approximately 8 scones.)
Potato scone dough ready to be rolled out.
Potato Scone dough, ready for rolling.
Potato scone dough being cut into rounds.
Cutting out the Potato Scones into perfect little rounds.

Cooking the Potato Scones

  • Heat a nonstick pan, cast iron pan, or griddle over medium heat, (350F for an electric griddle) and add a small amount of oil to the pan.
  • Gently lower the Potato Scones into the pan one at a time, being sure to leave space in between each one.
  • Cook them until golden brown on the first side, flip them, then cook them until golden brown on the second side. This should take about 2-4 minutes per side.
  • Transfer the cooked Scones to a cooling rack and enjoy right away or store them for up to 3 days in the fridge and reheat as desired.
Potato scones frying on an electric griddle.
Potato Scones sizzling away on the first side.
Potato scones frying on an electric griddle.
Flipped, lovely and golden brown.

Success tips

  • If your mashed potato mixture already has a lot of milk and butter in it, you might need to increase the amount of flour you mix into them. Start with the amount called for in the recipe, and increase as needed.
  • Be careful not to overwork the dough. Just mix it long enough for the dough to come together. Overworking the dough may lead to tough tattie scones.
  • Don’t let the pan get too hot. If your Potato Scones are becoming very dark brown within a minute or two, remove the pan from the heat for a minute, reduce the temperature, and resume cooking.
  • Don’t overcrowd the pan. Be patient and fry these in batches! Otherwise they will not cook as evenly, and they will be very hard to flip.
Potato scones on a cooling rack.

Frequently asked questions

Do I need to peel the potatoes?

Nope! I love bits of skins in my mashed potatoes (controversial, I know). If you’re like me, feel free to mix those bits right into your Tattie Scones!

Can I use any kind of potatoes?

Starchy potatoes like Russet or Yukon Gold are the best potatoes for mashing, but any mashed potatoes will do.

Can I make these gluten-free?

Yes! You can easily make this recipe gluten-free by replacing the all-purpose flour with all-purpose gluten-free flour.

Are potato scones vegan?

Yes! As long as you use a plant-based oil to fry them in, potato scones are vegan.

I hope you love these Tattie Scones as much as I do! Let me know how they turn out, and please feel free to comment with any questions I haven’t answered here. Enjoy!!

A stack of potato scones on a cooling rack.

Potato Scones (AKA Tattie Scones)

Potato Scones, AKA "Tattie Scones", are one of my favorite Scottish inventions. They are the perfect way to use up leftover mashed potato, and they are an absolute treat.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Course Breakfast & Brunch
Cuisine British
Servings 8 servings
Calories 94 kcal

Equipment

  • 1 nonstick pan or griddle
  • 1 bowl
  • 1 flipper

Ingredients
  

  • 2 cups mashed potato cold
  • 1/3 cup flour all-purpose
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons oil for frying

Instructions
 

Making the Potato Scone dough

  • Add cooled mashed potatoes, flour, salt, and pepper to a bowl or a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, and mix until just combined. The dough should not stick to your hands, and it should be firm enough to roll with a rolling pin.

Shaping the Potato Scones

  • Transfer the mashed potato dough mixture onto a lightly floured surface, press into a rough, flattened ball, and use a rolling pin with ample flour to roll it out to 1/4-1/3 inch thick. *See recipe notes for alternate shaping method!
  • Dip a large (4 inch), round cookie cutter in some flour and use it to cut the potato scones out of the dough. Continue reshaping and rolling out the dough until you have used it all up. You should get approximately 8 scones.

Cooking the Potato Scones

  • Heat a nonstick skillet over medium heat, or an electric griddle to 350F.
  • Add the oil to the pan, and gently lower in the potato scones a few at a time, leaving plenty of room in between them. If you are using an electric griddle, you may be able to fit them all in one batch.
  • Allow the potato scones to brown on one side for 2-4 minutes, then flip to brown the other side.
  • Once browned on both sides, transfer the potato scones to a cooling rack to cool.
  • Repeat with the rest of the scones, adding more oil to the pan as needed. There should be enough oil to sizzle around the edges of the scones.
  • Enjoy right away, or store for up to 3 days in the fridge and reheat in a toaster oven, air fryer, or frying pan as desired.

Video

Notes

  1. Rolling out the dough and cutting out the scones with a cookie cutter will give you very round, perfect-looking scones. Another option is to shape the potato scone dough into balls, and shape them into patties using your hands. (The classic version is a large round with a criss-cross indentation that makes it easy to break the scones into 4 triangles—as seen in the video!)

Nutrition

Calories: 94kcalCarbohydrates: 14gProtein: 2gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 0.3gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 2gTrans Fat: 0.01gSodium: 8mgPotassium: 240mgFiber: 1gSugar: 0.4gVitamin A: 1IUVitamin C: 11mgCalcium: 8mgIron: 1mg
Keyword potatoes
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